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Discipline mistakes to avoid after divorce

| Nov 11, 2018 | Child Custody & Support |

Disciplining kids can be difficult enough under ideal circumstances. It can be even tougher for Milwaukee parents who are divorced, especially when navigating issues regarding custody and visitation. The following are a few of the common mistakes divorced parents make when it comes to discipline and how you can best avoid them.

Pretending your child’s misbehavior is acceptable

It’s a fact that kids misbehave sometimes. Pretending otherwise will only harm your child, while also potentially impacting his or her relationship with your ex according to VeryWellFamily.com. Instead, be honest about your child’s misdeeds and work with your ex to find a solution. Also, don’t promise your child that you’ll keep bad behavior a secret in an attempt to curry favor. If your child is acting out on a frequent basis, consider visiting a family counselor for assistance.

Not being consistent

While it’s natural that rules will change from one household to another, do your best to keep the rules within your home consistent. For the greatest impact, punishments should continue upon return even if your child spends time at the other parent’s home. Consistency is good for kids in general, as it provides a sense of safety and security.

Not choosing your battles

You and your former spouse should come to an agreement on the major areas of child-rearing. With less important topics, Parents recommends choosing your battles carefully. For instance, something like eating candy after dinner isn’t necessarily a huge issue and fighting over it will only exacerbate ill-feelings. Try speaking rationally with your ex about these problems and compromising when appropriate.